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Karmapa 900 Delhi: Day One – A Tribute to The Indian Roots of The Karmapa Lineage

December 23, 2011 – Delhi.

Before a crowd composed of disciples and delegates from nearly every state in India and from 44 countries around the world, Karmapa 900 Delhi began a three-day gala event to commemorate the 900th birth anniversary of the First Karmapa, Dusum Khyenpa. Today’s event was focused on paying tribute to the Indian roots of the Karma Kagyu lineage.

To open the day’s activities, His Holiness the 17th Karmapa travelled to the National Museum of India to pay solemn homage to the relics of Lord Buddha enshrined there. With the aim of creating harmony among all faiths, a gathering of leaders from virtually all the major world religions gathered at Rajghat, the monument to Mahatma Gandhi, joining their voices in interfaith prayer.

Hindu priests opened the event at Gandhi’s memorial with Vedic chants, and were followed by prayers from the Jain, Jewish, Parsi, Christian, Sikh, Muslim and Baha’i spiritual traditions. Several hundred followers attended the interfaith gathering, which marked the first public activity of Karmapa 900 Delhi.

Following the formal event, the leaders joined Gyalwang Karmapa for tea and a lovely exchange of views in an informal setting.

Meanwhile, back at the main venue for Karmapa 900 Delhi, before the afternoon session even began, the crowd already filled the ballroom of the Grand Hotel and began spilling out into the adjacent outdoor patio. Advance registration had been closed within a week when the number of attendees hit 850, yet visitors who had travelled from overseas to attend pleaded their case to be allowed admission without having registered. In the end, nearly a thousand people were on hand when His Holiness arrived to commence the session.

A traditional Tibetan procession escorted a rare and exceptional statue of the First Karmapa, Dusum Khyenpa renowned for having uttered human speech. For centuries the statue attracted pilgrims from all over eastern Tibet to Ripa Barma monastery in Kham, where it was housed until the communist Chinese invasion of Tibet. The statue was brought to safety in India shortly before Ripa Barma was destroyed, and currently serves as the most precious holy object at the rebuilt Ripa Barma Monastery in the state of Karnataka.

After His Holiness and the chief guest had offered a lamp, a brief account of the historical ties between the Karmapa lineage and India was offered by the master of ceremonies, Choechung Wangchuk, member of the parliament of the Tibetan administration in exile. To begin with, the First Karmapa trained intensively in the cultivation of bodhicitta and meditation techniques taught by the great Indian mahasiddhas Saraha, Tilopa and Naropa. His lineage then transmitted those teachings for the next 900 years in Tibet.

Dusum Khyenpa’s years of solitary yogic practices took him to caves and forests all across Tibet and into India. His biographies recount an encounter with a tiger while he was doing meditative retreat in modern day Indian territory. For the next 500 years, most of the Karmapas, up to and including the Ninth Karmapa, maintained close relationships with Bodhgaya. They sent offerings to maintain the holy Mahabodhi stupa and corresponded with senior gurus in north India. The Twelfth Karmapa made the journey to India personally to visit the holy Buddhist sites of India, the MC related. In recent times, the 16th and 17th Gyalwang Karmapas each fled Chinese-ruled Tibet to seek refuge in India, thus renewing the First Karmapa´s special bond with India, he said.

Next on the afternoon’s schedule was an address by His Holiness the 17th Karmapa himself. The Gyalwang Karmapa first clarified that he does not see Karmapa 900 as a celebration of himself, but rather as an opportunity to recollect the qualities of the great masters of the past and gain inspiration in seeking to emulate them.

He went on to describe the close ties between India and the Karma Kagyu lineage that he transmits. “Our teachings too were born and took root with the Mahasiddhas of India….The masters of this lineage were able to hold these teachings in such a way that the lineage never became just the reverberation of words, but rather became a true lineage of experience and realization…. This lineage continued in an unbroken way through the ages, first originating in India, then abiding for many hundreds of years in Tibet.  Now, once again, this noble lineage has returned to the noble land of India. I think that this is something that we should all be very proud of. This is something that we should all be very inspired by. It is a marvelous fact that this lineage remains alive today, and has once again returned to the noble land of India.”

The Gyalwang Karmapa described the tireless activities of His Holiness the Dalai Lama in spreading the message of compassion and peace to the world. “Basically,” the Gyalwang Karmapa noted, “what His Holiness the Dalai Lama is doing when he delivers this message is propagating the wisdom of ancient India. This wisdom of ancient India was also the pure nectar that was held for hundreds of years in the snowy land in Tibet, and this pure nectar is now being shared as a gift with the entire world.”

Nevertheless, he quipped that in terms of copyright, one would have to say there was no question but that India was the holder of the copyright to Buddhism!

His Holiness’ speech was followed by a dazzling display of his affection and appreciation for the Indian roots of his Dharma lineage. Last year, in preparation for the Opening Ceremony of Karmapa 900 in Bodhgaya, the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa had begun a search for the original texts of dohas, spontaneous songs of realization sung by highly accomplished masters. Many such dohas exist today only in Tibetan translations, while the original Sanskrit texts are largely lost.

Nevertheless, His Holiness located the vernacular Indian text of a doha by Tilopa, a great mahasiddha from Bengal and contacted Shree Sangita Vidvan Nanda Kumar, a scholar and singer committed to researching and reviving India’s ancient song heritage. His Holiness requested him to set the doha verses to music, following traditional doha song forms as faithfully as possible.

The result of this research were two dohas performed in Sanskrit by Vidvan Nanda Kumar and a team of accomplished musicians that included his wife Radhika and son Sumukha.

The singer began with Sanskrit verses that he composed in homage to His Holiness the Karmapa. Following that, the audience was witness to an event of deep spiritual as well as historical significance, as Vidvan Nanda Kumar sang Saraha’s doha publicly in Sanskrit for the first time in over a millennium.

They next performed a spontaneous song of realization by Tilopa, a great Mahamudra master in the Karma Kagyu transmission lineage.

With the public performance of these two Sanskrit dohas, set to historically accurate music, the singers accomplished His Holiness the Karmapa’s wish to revive this Indian Buddhist song form that had been all but lost to history.

The next portion of the afternoon’s program was given over to speeches by four honoured guests. First to speak was the internationally revered meditation master, Gurumaa, who spoke movingly of how extraordinary it is to have a living master who is willing to return to benefit beings and also capable of pinpointing the time, place and parents to whom they will return. She spoke of the Buddha nature in each of us, and reminded the audience how fortunate they were to have a spiritual master such as His Holiness. “A living master is the best example of what you can become. You can choose to be that, or you can choose not to be that,” she said. “But the guru provides the living model to follow, if we choose to,” she said.

Next to speak was Dr. BK Modi. Although best known as Chairman of the Indian conglomerate Spice Group, Dr. Modi has made lasting contributions to the flourishing of Buddhism in India in modern times, and is currently patron of the Mahabodhi Society of India. Dr. Modi noted that when the Nalanda tradition was being destroyed in India, Tibetan’s stepped forward and gave that tradition a home in Tibet. “We must acknowledge the hardship and dedication with which the people of Tibet preserved this knowledge.”

Kalon Tenpa Tsering, the primary representative of His Holiness the Dalai Lama in Delhi and one of the longest-serving members of the Tibetan administration in exile, also spoke as an honoured guest.

As chief guest at Karmapa 900 Delhi, the final speaker of the afternoon was Shri Wajahat Habibullah, Honourable Chairman of the National Commission for Minorities. Presenting a sophisticated vision of a secular India that still welcomes a diversity of religious views and practices, he observed that India had not only given birth to many of the world’s major religious traditions, it had also offered the gifts of that wisdom to the world.

“His Holiness’ presence among us reminds us of our duty to ourselves and our duty to the world,” said Shree Habibullah. He called for the world to truly act on the principles of compassion preached by all faiths. “I believe,” Shri Habibullah said, “that it is time to return to the wisdom of the great being, of which His Holiness is the reincarnation.”

Finally, His Holiness presented mementoes to the chief guest and esteemed guests on the dais, and the crowd joyfully dispersed, buoyed by the beauty of the vision of Buddhism returning to India articulated during the afternoon, and by the prospect of a day of teachings from the Gyalwang Karmapa tomorrow.

AFTERNOON SESSION

During the afternoon session of Karmapa 900 Delhi, Day One the Gyalwang Karmapa gave the opening address.

I’d like to begin by welcoming all of our honored guests to this observation of the 900th anniversary of the Karmapa lineage, which is being held in Delhi. I’d like to extend my warm welcome as well to all of my dharma friends gathered here. Welcome everyone and Tashi Delek.

When we consider this occasion of the 900th anniversary of the Karmapa lineage, and the observation that we are holding here, many people may look on this in some way as a celebration of me, the Karmapa, but I’d like to make it clear that this is not the attitude that I have. In my own mind, I come here today as a follower or student of the Karmapa lineage. In no way do I see this as any type of celebration of myself.

I think it’s important for us to step back and look at what the notion of commemoration means. In Buddhism we talk about the buddhas and the bodhisattvas, who are their sons or daughters, and we speak of the importance of recalling, or bringing to mind again and again the noble and excellent qualities of their body, speech and mind. We can use that recollection as a stepping stone to further inspire ourselves to emulate them in body, speech and mind, so that we can bring more benefit to ourselves and others as well. I think that is really the heart of what a true practice of commemoration and recollection is.

On this particular occasion, we are recalling a lineage and tradition that has lasted for the past 900 years as one part of the vast tradition we call Tibetan Buddhism. One school within that tradition is known as the Karma Kagyu lineage, and the particular guru or master we are celebrating today is known as Dusum Khyenpa, the First Karmapa. This occasion offers us the chance to recall, commemorate or bring to mind the noble and excellent qualities of Dusum Khyenpa’s body, speech and mind, and try to make this a stepping stone in our own life, so that now and in the future, we can come to benefit ourselves and the world more and more. We can use this as an occasion to refresh that inspiration and sense of commitment.

As we know, the tradition and teachings of Tibetan Buddhism have survived and developed in Tibet in a very remote and isolated context for hundreds of years—roughly one thousand years, in fact—before they started to gain exposure to the wider world. Although Tibet was in many ways devoid of much material development, its spiritual development and spiritual teachings were able to flourish over this period. In such a context, many Tibetan practitioners were able to pay a great deal of attention to the Buddhist teachings and bring them deeply into their experience. We’re arriving now at a time when the richness of this process is not only a fruit to be enjoyed by Tibetans alone, but is becoming a gift that can be shared with the whole world.

On that note I think it’s very important for us to be clear and to acknowledge that Dusum Khyenpa was simply one of a great many highly accomplished masters. He was one of a great many people who were able to master the teachings and practice of Buddhism in this way. In holding this celebration of Dusum Khyenpa’s life and the 900 years of his tradition, the point is not to assert that he was the only person who reached that level of accomplishment. It is important for us to know that there were many, many masters who reached a similar level of accomplishment. Therefore, rather than regarding this as a celebration of just one individual person’s accomplishment, we can take this whole festival as a celebration of the accomplishments of a great many noble, enlightened, powerful masters of Tibetan Buddhism.

In general, as students of Buddhism, we enter into the teachings, we connect with a spiritual friend or spiritual master, and then we endeavor to accomplish the instructions that he or she gives us as best we can for the benefit of both ourselves and others. However, I think the truest and most powerful form of spiritual instruction is the life example of the masters themselves. Of course, we receive many precious teachings from the masters. But from one perspective, when compared to the actual example of their deeds and their experience, the things they say to us are of lesser power. The life examples of the masters themselves are something that we can directly witness with our own eyes, and be One point I would like to make impacted by in our own experience. They are a gateway to the master’s enlightened qualities of body, speech and mind. So when we approach the histories or biographies of the enlightened masters, we are not doing just a history lesson. We are not just reviewing events that happened in the past. Rather, we are trying to invoke a spirit in ourselves that endeavors to emulate their example and really achieve these enlightened qualities of body, speech and mind ourselves. In this way, by reacquainting ourselves with the life examples of the great masters of the past, we’re making them fresh and alive once more.

I think there are many reasons why that the fact that we are holding this commemoration in the noble land of India is very special, meaningful and important. As we know, India was the birthplace of Buddhism as a whole. In particular, in the case of the Karma Kagyu lineage, our teachings too were born and took root with the Mahasiddhas of India. Their realization and experience was passed down in an unbroken lineage and eventually came to the snowy land of Tibet. The masters of this lineage were able to hold these teachings in such a way that the lineage never became just the reverberation of words, but rather became a true lineage of experience and realization. This lineage consists in the transmission of the qualities of freedom from confusion and of realization of true reality. This lineage continued in an unbroken way through the ages, first originating in India, then abiding for many hundreds of years in Tibet, and now, once again, this noble lineage has returned to the noble land of India. I think that this is something that we should all be very proud of. This is something that we should all be very inspired by. It is a marvelous fact that this lineage remains alive today, and has once again returned to the noble land of India.

I therefore think that it is a special honor to share this occasion with our noble guests today who are of Indian descent as well as with our many friends who are gathered here today from the various regions of the Himalayan plateau. It is very important and meaningful to me that we are gathered here today for this occasion as Indian brothers and sisters, Tibetan brothers and sisters, and people from the Himalayas.

Whether we refer to it as Buddhism or as spiritual guidance from long ago, basically the source of all of this was the noble land of India. Perhaps we can apply this to a modern concept of copyright and ask the question, “Who holds the copyright to all of this wisdom?” There can be only answer to this: The noble land of India is the copyright holder of all of this.

One wonderful example of how this wisdom is being shared in the world is the work and activity of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. His Holiness the Dalai Lama has been traveling the world for many, many years, spreading the message of how to accomplish world peace, how to follow the path of nonviolence, how to spread more love in the world, and how societies can cultivate more harmony within themselves. Basically, what His Holiness the Dalai Lama is doing when he delivers this message is propagating the wisdom of ancient India. This wisdom of ancient India was also the pure nectar that was held for hundreds of years in the snowy land in Tibet, and this pure nectar is now being shared as a gift with the entire world.

So rather than viewing this occasion as just a celebration, instead I think we should view this as a chance to further inspire ourselves, to further boost our positive motivation, to open our heart even further, to expand our mind even further, and to expand our intention even further—so that we can bring true benefit to the world and really adopt together this responsibility of cultivating further world peace.

That is basically all that I have to say for now. There’s no need for me to go on for a long time. We have other honored guests who are going to be speaking as well, and they will undoubtedly have some very profound sentiments to share with us, so I would just like to conclude by once again thanking my honored guests for joining me here today, as well as all of you, my dharma friends. Thank you.

For full reports of the coming day’s activities, please visit www.karmapa900.org.

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