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How to Use Meditation as a Source of Inner Peace (Podcast Episode #008)

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Today’s podcast episode is a special two hour event from the Karmapa’s recent trip to Europe.

In this wonderful teaching, the Gyalwang Karmapa discusses how to use meditation to develop inner peace and contentment in a modern, fast-paced world.

In the second session (which starts at the 1 hour mark), the Karmapa goes on to discuss his own life experience as a child in Tibet and, after being recognized as the Karmapa, how he himself has used meditation in his own daily activities and life events.

The session finishes with a wonderful Question and Answer session where the Karmapa touches on many important topics to do with Read the rest of this article

What is the Cause of All Our Suffering?

2016.06.04 day 1
Paris, France – June 4, 2016
The Conference Hall of the Marriott Rive-Gauche has been transformed a shrine hall. In the center of the stage is a radiant throne topped by cluster of golden flaming jewels. Behind a long thangka of the Buddha is flanked by a 1000-armed Avalokiteshvara and, emphasizing the nonsectarian approach to Dharma, a thangka of the Eight Great Charioteers or the Lineages of Transmission in Tibet (nyingma, kadampa, sakya, Marpa kagyu, shangpa kagyu, shije and chö , kalachakra or jordrug, and Orgyen nyengyu). To stage right is a pagoda with two floating roofs. Inside the upper shrine is a statue of the Buddha and below this is enshrined a lovely four-armed Avalokiteshvara.

With a capacity of 1600, the hall is filled to overflowing. Above, the ceiling lights are set in waves of crystal, recalling Read the rest of this article

A Medicine Buddha Empowerment

2016.05.22
22nd May 2016 -Geneva, Switzerland
The Medicine Buddha tradition was brought to Tibet from India in the 8th century by the great Indian Buddhist master, the abbot Shantarakshita of Nalanda (725–788), who gave the teachings to the Tibetan king Trisong Deutsen. The abbot’s aim was to increase the welfare of Tibet: to improve health, prevent disease, give protection against black magic, and protect the ecological system from natural disasters.

Today, the Geneva Theatre next to its famous lake was filled with people eager to receive the empowerment. To the right and above His Holiness’ throne, a huge thangka depicted the Medicine Buddha, who embodies the healing energy of all enlightened beings. He is a dark blue, the colour of lapis lazuli, and wears monastic robes while sitting on a lion throne. In his left hand he holds a begging bowl Read the rest of this article

The Gyalwang Karmapa Speaks to Tibetans in Geneva

2016.05.21 tibMay 21, 2016 -Geneva, Switzerland
Following his afternoon talk, the Karmapa spoke with about hundred Tibetans who live in the Geneva area, augmented by those who came from farther afield to be present today. He conversed with them in great sympathy for the problems they face wherever they might live, in India, Tibet, or other countries of the world. He encouraged them not to give up on their hopes but to sustain their enthusiasm and make efforts until these hopes were fulfilled.

The most important thing, he said, was to maintain their Tibetan language, which gives them access to the Buddhism of Tibet and to their culture. Those with children should teach them as much as they can. Finally, he counseled the Tibetans to support each other, giving assistance when needed and being affectionate and kind.

Afterward, a cultural Read the rest of this article

Offerings to the Sangha: the Alms Procession and the 16 Arhats

2016.02.21
21 February, 2016 -Monlam Pavillion, Bodhgaya
The tradition of almsgiving dates back to the beginnings of Buddhism, 2500 years ago. At that time monks and nuns were not allowed to keep or prepare food and were therefore completely dependent on whatever they were offered to eat by the local community. Each morning they would go from door to door and collect food. By offering food to the Sangha, laypeople not only showed their respect to the spiritual values that the Sangha symbolized, but were able to accumulate merit both by the action of generosity towards the Sangha and also by sharing in the merit which the monks and nuns generated through their spiritual practice.

In some Buddhist countries, the custom of the alms round has survived to this day, but in Tibet, because monasteries were supported by the local communities, it was no longer Read the rest of this article