Google+ Tag Archive for "Lord Buddha" - Karmapa – The Official Website of the 17th Karmapa

NEWS & CURRENT ACTIVITES

Keep up to date with the Karmapa's activities, teachings and travels by subscribing by email or Twitter below. You can unsubscribe whenever you like.

Gyalwang Karmapa’s Spring Teachings: Session One

March 9-12, 2011. Sarnath, Varanasi.

His Holiness Begins Annual Spring Teachings in Sarnath

The Gyalwang Karmapa is currently on an annual springtime visit to his senior tutor’s monastery, the Vajra Vidya Institute, in Sarnath, outside of Varanasi. This is a special time when he receives private initiations and teachings from Khenchen Yongzin Thrangu Rinpoche, a highly respected Karma Kagyu master, who was appointed as his senior tutor by His Holiness the Dalai Lama.

This is the third year in a row that the Gyalwang Karmapa has given spring teachings to an audience of local Tibetan, Indian, and international students at the Vajra Vidya Institute. His students worldwide look forward to what has become an annual event in this highly auspicious place, where the Lord Buddha taught the Dharma for the first time after his enlightenment.

Nearly six hundred people gathered to listen to Read the rest of this article

Lamp for the Path to Enlightenment – Teachings by The Gyalwang Karmapa: Day One

December 10, 2010 – Bodhgaya

MORNING SESSION
Compassion is the Essence of the Path

In Bodh Gaya, where the Buddha has walked the land, moving along his way to the Bodhi Tree and full awakening, the 17th Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, has presided over the Kagyu Monlam since 2004 and given teachings to his disciples. This year he has built a vast stage for Dharma teachings and cultural performances. Above it are monumental arches covered with azure blue cloth, and in its middle is a golden canopy, floating like the sun in empty space. Aligned underneath is a statue of the Buddha, framed in a shell of radiant light, and then a statue of the first Karmapa, Dusum Khyenpa, who is so life-like that many people think the Karmapa has come early and is meditating on his throne. Next, just after the circle of a brilliant sun cascades down the steps, is the Karmapa’s throne, surrounded by generous bouquets of flowers. Seen from the end of the pavilions that host thousands of guests, the perspective of the central aisle gives a brilliant and spacious image of the lineage, descending from the Buddha to the first Karmapa and coming down to the present 17th Read the rest of this article

Nun’s Education and Conduct in Modern Times

On October 18th, 2008, His Holiness the Gyalwang Karmapa was invited to preside over the second all-night debate session of the fourteenth Jamyang Guncho for nuns, which was held at Jamyang Choling Institute in Dharamsala. Over two hundred nuns from seven different nunneries were present. The following presents the main points of the remarks which His Holiness gave on that occasion.

These days many friends from abroad with a modern viewpoint are giving help and direction to Tibetan nuns and laywomen and I would like to thank them for their help. But I think we need to begin from within our own Tibetan society to find a particular Tibetan way of being modern. The reason for this is that other viewpoints and Tibetan culture are sometimes incompatible, and as Tibetan culture is already endangered, insisting too strongly on imposing other ways of doing things could very well weaken what we are working hard to preserve.

There are quotations in the scriptures and treatises which say that ordaining women as nuns will make the Buddhist teachings disappear five hundred years earlier than otherwise. Some people cite these passages to scare you. Others try to explain them away, saying they should not be taken literally. In any case, I don’t think it is necessary to do either. The reason is Read the rest of this article

His Holiness Visits the Mulagandha Kuty Temple

January 22, 2009

His Holiness visits the Mulagandha Kuty Temple which has the relic of Lord Buddha at 9:30 am. The in charge of Temple Ven Sumedha-Thero welcomed him at the Temple gate and escorted inside, where he made short prayer. Ven Thero presented an image of Buddha to His Holiness. Read more

26th Kagyu Monlam: January 5, 2009

His Holiness Karmapa gave a short commentary:

The Lord Buddha said that two things were essential: study and practice. Gampopa advised people to study first. The Kagyu is known as the practice lineage, and meditation plays a central role; it is the lineage of experience and realization. Like Milarepa, we had to receive the instructions, and then put them into practice. This involved hardship and effort.

Some Kagyu masters had studied extensively and then practiced, but others had had little formal study. Milarepa had not studied widely, but he had great devotion. He received the instructions, the direct understanding of how to practice, and then he practiced.

A Nyingma lama once said that when we were really suffering and our minds were deeply disturbed, the only things which helped were Shantideva’s Way of the Bodhisattva, and The Songs of Milarepa. Correct meditation depends on correct view, and the correct view is emptiness. The lama, who has direct experience of the nature of the mind, gives instructions to the devoted student who must study, analyze, gain a conceptual understanding and practice it. His Holiness commented that although Kagyu say they are the practice lineage, when we study the biographies of great masters it can make us feel ashamed. As the saying goes, Read the rest of this article