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Live Broadcast of 27th Kagyu Monlam: Begins Dec 20, 2009

The entire 27th Kagyu Monlam Chenmo will be broadcast live on www.kagyumonlam.tv starting from December 20th, 2009 until January 1, 2010.

The first broadcast will be of Dharma Teachings by His Holiness the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa on “A Letter to a Friend”. Read the rest of this article

Gyalwang Karmapa Arrives in Bodhgaya

November 29, 2009 – Bodhgaya

His Holiness Karmapa arrived in Bodhgaya today at 4:30pm. While in Bodhgaya, His Holiness will be participating in the 13th Karmae Gunchoe, the 27th Kagyu Monlam, and he will later attend His Holiness Dalai Lama’s teachings during the beginning of January, 2010. Read more

Gyalwang Karmapa Launches His Booklet: Environmental Guidelines for Karma Kagyu Buddhist Monasteries, Centers and Community

Gyalwang Karmapa’s booklet, Environmental Guidelines for Karma Kagyu Buddhist Monasteries, Centres and Community went on sale at the end of Kagyu Monlam. So far the booklet has been published in English and Chinese; the Tibetan edition should be available in February/March 2009. His Holiness briefly described the booklet and his own deep concerns about the environment on the second day of the Western teaching.
He explained how he had first spoken about environmental concerns at the end of the 25th Kagyu Monlam. He had mentioned his worries again in his concluding speech at the 26th Kagyu Monlam. He then detailed the five sections of the booklet, by highlighting the destruction of forests in India and Tibet, the danger to water supplies, the protection of wildlife, the need for waste management, and the threat of global warming and climate change.
He admitted the culpability of some monasteries in cutting down trees to be sold as timber. This had to be stopped and those forests replanted.
Glaciers and snow melt in the Himalayan region are the source of water and thereby the source of life for millions of people throughout Asia, rivers from Tibet flow to China, Burma, India and Pakistan, so it was essential to both protect the source and prevent the Read the rest of this article

Last Day of 26th Kagyu Monlam

January 11th, 2009

The Last Day of the 26th Kagyu Monlam. His Holiness gave the Sojong Vows and precepts in the morning, the assembly recited the Twenty Branch Monlam. The second session concluded with the annual alms procession.

The Alms procession is from the Mahabodhi Stupa to the Deer Park it was instituted by His Holiness Karmapa five years ago to follow the traditional alms walk that the monastic of some Buddhist traditions make in their daily lives to receive their food. His Holiness also wanted for eight days to recreate, along with some other original Vinaya practices, the alms walk that ordained monastic undertook daily at the time of the Buddha.

The lay people and other monks and nuns gathered along the route of the procession eagerly waiting with their offerings of sweets, fruits, biscuits, nuts and dried fruits and snacks.

His Eminence Gyaltsab Rinpoche led the procession, carrying the traditional monk’s staff. Behind him, and also carrying staffs, came Zurmang Garwang Rinpoche, Mingyur Rinpoche and Khenpo Lodro Donyo Rinpoche. Then the most senior gelongs began to assemble and slowly made their way with the begging bowl in Read the rest of this article

Kagyu Monlam: Kangyur Procession

January 10, 2009

Kangyur (the Tibetan name for the Buddhist sutras) procession is one of important ceremony of Monlam.

At the head of the procession came the incense bearer and four monks playing gyalin. They were followed by Khenpo Hye-Neung, of Karma Jang Chub Dzong, Korea, Ven. Mingyur Rinpoche, Ven. Kalu Rinpoche, Ven. Dhoenyo Rinpoche, H.E. Goshir Gyaltsab Rinpoche and H.E. Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche. Then came the ninety-nine gelong and four gelongma, each bearing a volume of the Kangyur, balanced respectfully on their left shoulders, steadied and supported by both hands. They walked at a steady, dignified pace along the pre-planned route, which took them along the side of the Mahabodhi Stupa, before climbing the stairs to the outer circuit. They completed one circuit and then returned to the Mahabodhi Stupa. Everything went very smoothly, perhaps because the Gyalwang Karmapa himself had directed and supervised the rehearsals for the event.

The route around the outer circuit of the temple was lined with sangha and laypeople showing respect by offering lotuses and other flowers.

Reading the Kangyur

After the procession had completed its circuit, the texts were distributed between the different monasteries and nunneries for the second part of the ritual, Read the rest of this article