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The Science of Climate Change and Practical Rainwater Harvesting

Conference on Environmental Protection – Day 6 – October 8, 2009 – Dharamsala

Dekil began with an account of climate change because of global warming, which has led to increased rainfall in some areas and drought in others,  glaciers in the Himalaya were shrinking, sea levels were rising, extreme weather events were increasing. In severely  affected areas, the population was forced to relocate leading to social unrest. The long-term consequences would be on power and water supplies.

Dekil then gave detailed instructions on rain water harvesting , how monasteries could collect rainwater from the rooftops, filter it and store it in tanks.

 

Environmental Destruction in Tibet

Tsering Yangkyi from TESI Environmental Awareness Movement gave a detailed presentation on what is happening in Tibet including deforestation and the effects of large-scale mining for minerals.

 

The Effects of Climate Change on Tibet

Chokyi, from the Environment and Development desk of the DIIR, showed  slides illustrating how climate change has already led to  shrinking glaciers and lakes,  degraded pasturelands, most memorable, the sacred Gang Rinpoche (Snow Rinpoche ie  Mt Kailash )  with hardly any Read the rest of this article

Questions, Discussion and Testing

Conference on Environmental Protection – Day 5 – October 7, 2009 – Dharamsala

Question and Answer Session

Dekil Chungyalpa answered questions arising from Tuesday’s sessions on wildlife protection.

Some key points that emerged:

  • The monastic community has a responsibility to lead and give advice on environmental issues.
  • Protecting the environment also protects wildlife – they are not separate activities.

The monks and nuns wanted to know more about how they themselves could protect wildlife. Read more

Gyalwang Karmapa on Protection of Wildlife and Waste Conservation

Conference on Environmental Protection – Day 4 – October 6, 2009 – Dharamsala

The morning began with a question and answer session.

 

Waste Management

The main topic for the morning was waste management.  Dr Anjan Kumar Kalia (Him Renewable Energy Consultants) gave a clear and comprehensive presentation on waste management. He first explained the different types of waste and highlighted that although waste could be a problem it was also a wealth.

His then focused on vermi-composting which used kitchen waste,    and bio-gas, which is produced from animal and human waste.  The session concluded with questions from the audience.

 

The overall theme for the afternoon was Wildlife Protection

The Science of Conservation

Dekil Chungyalpa began the session and talked about bio-diversity, and Gyalwang Karmapa translated into Tibetan. She explained how the term biodiversity refers to species, gene pool, ecosystem and ecological  processes.

Human activity has had a devastating effect.  Scientific evidence shows that, as modern human beings spread across the globe, many species became extinct. In the past it was due to hunting, Read the rest of this article

Forestry Conservation Preservation by World Wildlife Fund of India

Environmental Conference Day Three: Monday 5th October, 2009 

Forest Conservation

Sanjeep Pradhan, from World Wildlife Fund India, gave a lively presentation on forestry conservation.

He began by explaining the importance of forests and plants and the critical role they play in supporting not just human life but a vast biodiversity and controlling levels of carbon dioxide and oxygen. However, forests were under threat and already rising temperatures globally showed the devastating effect of this. Read more

Gyalwang Karmapa Explains Scientific View of Cosmology

Environmental Conference Day Two: Sunday 4th October, 2009

The Morning Session

Gyalwang Karmapa on the Universe, Ecology and Buddhism

Many of the monastic representatives have not had the chance to study modern science so Gyalwang Karmapa began by giving a slide-show presentation of scientific cosmology in which he demonstrated the vastness of the universe and the minuteness of earth and the solar system within it.

Using earth as his starting point, he illustrated its position as the very small planet, third from the sun, comparing its size with Jupiter (1114 times bigger) and the sun (900 times bigger than Jupiter). From that he moved to the solar system’s place in the Milky Way galaxy, explaining the need to use  light years  to measure vast distances, and, then, finally, he described the universe, and demonstrated how even something as vast as our galaxy (100, 000 light years across) was minute when compared with the universe itself.  Read the rest of this article