NEWS & CURRENT ACTIVITES

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The Power of Compassion: Four-Armed Avalokiteshvara Empowerment

2016.06.05 wnag
June 5, 2016 – Paris, France
On Sunday morning, the Karmapa spoke once more of the interconnectedness of all sentient beings and urged everyone to break out of their prison of ego-clinging through developing their compassion. His emphasis on compassion was evident once more in the afternoon, when he concluded his teachings in Paris with the empowerment of Four-Armed Avalokiteshvara, the meditation deity who embodies the compassion of all the buddhas.

At the end of the morning session, the Karmapa explained that this particular empowerment comes from the Nyingma tradition and is found in the Treasury of Precious Terma collected by the First Jamgon Kongtrul Lodrö Thaye. In the Nyingma tradition, there are three categories of teachings: ka-ma, ter-ma, and dak-nang. This empowerment is a dak-nang, originating from Read the rest of this article

Tibetan Unity and Language Are Crucial

2016.06.04 tibetan meeting
June 4, 2016 – Paris, France
This afternoon The Conference Center of the Marriott Hotel on the famous Left Bank of Paris was filled with thousands of Tibetans of all ages, from an old woman with sweet smile who wore an elegant chupa in brown brocade and her thinning grey hair tied back in a bun, down to the young generation of men wearing jeans under their chupa and their hair in the latest style, part cut very close and other long, looking in this context as if they were half lay and half monk. A group of ten in white shirts and black chupas joined eight young women, who were also dressed in back and white with their hair in long plaits down their backs, as they all welcomed the Karmapa with a Tibetan song.

The leader of the association of Tibetans offered an Read the rest of this article

Wishing for the Happiness of Others

2016.06.05 am
June 5, 2016 – Paris, France
Set in front of the throne this morning is a wide sofa chair covered with brocade. The Karmapa entered the hall from the left side and took his place on the chair, which gave a closer, more intimate connection to the audience that fills the hall wall to wall. The question and answer period went so long yesterday, he commented, there was no time for instruction on meditation, so he proposed beginning with meditation today.

On his last tour in the US, the Karmapa related that he had visited the Google and Facebook campuses, each of which have a room set aside for meditation, a sign that interest in meditation is increasing. He was concerned, however, that meditation might go the way of yoga, losing its traditional context and value, and turning into one more thing to market.

There are many Read the rest of this article

How to Free Ourselves from Suffering and Achieve Lasting Happiness

2016.06.04 pm
June 4, 2016 – Paris, France
Gyalwang Karmapa began the afternoon session with a short recap. He explained that the first two truths concern afflicted states, in terms of suffering and its origin. He then began an exploration of the third Noble Truth, that of the cessation of suffering.

He reminded everyone that there are two aspects to the truth of the origin of suffering— karma and the afflictions—and that the basis of all our afflictions is clinging to what we perceive as reality. “So we need to examine whether what we cling to as being true, as being real, is actually real or not” he explained. This is difficult because we are working from “the perspective of clinging to reality itself.” This way of thinking lacks the capacity to examine whether its objects actually exist in the way it thinks they do. For Read the rest of this article

What is the Cause of All Our Suffering?

2016.06.04 day 1
Paris, France – June 4, 2016
The Conference Hall of the Marriott Rive-Gauche has been transformed a shrine hall. In the center of the stage is a radiant throne topped by cluster of golden flaming jewels. Behind a long thangka of the Buddha is flanked by a 1000-armed Avalokiteshvara and, emphasizing the nonsectarian approach to Dharma, a thangka of the Eight Great Charioteers or the Lineages of Transmission in Tibet (nyingma, kadampa, sakya, Marpa kagyu, shangpa kagyu, shije and chö , kalachakra or jordrug, and Orgyen nyengyu). To stage right is a pagoda with two floating roofs. Inside the upper shrine is a statue of the Buddha and below this is enshrined a lovely four-armed Avalokiteshvara.

With a capacity of 1600, the hall is filled to overflowing. Above, the ceiling lights are set in waves of crystal, recalling Read the rest of this article