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How to Use Emptiness as a Means to Develop Compassion and Freedom (Podcast Episode #010)

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Today we are happy to bring you the tenth episode in the new Podcast series containing selected talks and teachings by His Holiness the 17th Karmapa.

This special teaching took place in the USA and has Tibetan with an English translation.

During this episode, the Gyalwang Karmapa discusses how to meditate on emptiness, and how such meditations can lead to the natural development of compassion. Emptiness opens us up to a new realm of possibility, gratitude, and freedom which can lead to greater compassionate action.

You can get the podcast Read the rest of this article

Gyalwang Karmapa Brings to a Close His Commentary on the Heart Sutra

2016.08.18
The final session of the 17th Karmapa’s commentary on the Heart Sutra began with a brief explanation of the differences in the view of emptiness among the Middle Way (Madhyamaka), Mind Only (Chittamātra), and the Buddha Nature (Tathāgatagarbha) schools of Buddhism. The prajna paramita sutras, the Karmapa reminded everyone, are the root of philosophy of Mahayana Buddhism. All of its three main schools have their respective views of the four-fold emptiness and how emptiness and phenomena are related. However, the Karmapa cautioned, since all of them are teachings of the Buddha, it is not appropriate to say that one is superior to another. A variety of explanations are available in order to pacify our different afflictions.

The Middle Way school considers that the four-fold emptiness shows that all phenomena are essentially not truly existent, and Read the rest of this article

Celebrating Dharma Connections

2016.08.18pm
August 18, 2016 – Gurgaon, India
The last afternoon of the Heart Sutra teachings saw a celebration of the entire seminar. The hundreds of low meditation tables in the hall had been set with a plate of the famous Taiwanese pineapple cake and a cup of renowned high mountain tea, both of which had been brought from Taiwan to India.

After His Holiness entered the hall and took his seat on the stage, the event began with twenty people taking three minutes each to share their experience of the seminar. Standing near the stage where the Karmapa sat in a high backed chair, and facing hundreds of people, they passed the microphone from one to the other and spoke of how they had been touched by the Karmapa’s presence, by his teaching so clearly and directly in Mandarin, and by the profound words of the sutra. Some people cried and the Read the rest of this article

The Nature of Everything Is Emptiness

2016.08.17.pm
August 17, 2016 – Gurgaon.
This afternoon the Karmapa continued to examine some of the points that he had talked about in the morning, when he focused on the lines of the sutra: “Form is emptiness; emptiness is form. Emptiness is none other than form; form is none other than emptiness.” Continuing from here, the sutra names the other four skandhas:

    Likewise sensation, perception, formation, and consciousness are empty.

When Avalokiteshvara explained emptiness, he started with the five skandhas: form, sensation, perception, formation, and consciousness. Using modern terms, we can classify these into two categories: matter, the first skandha of form, and mind (or psychology), the remaining four. All phenomena fall into the categories of these five skandhas. In our daily lives, we focus on material things and Read the rest of this article

The View of Emptiness and the Path to Buddhahood

2016.08.17.am
17 August 2016 – Hyatt Regency Gurgaon,
His Holiness began the fourth session of his commentary on the Heart Sutra by reviewing the topics that had been covered in the previous sessions and then resumed his commentary on Section Five, the question:

    Son of a noble family, how should any son or daughter of noble family train, when they wish to practise the profound transcendent wisdom?

The Karmapa skilfully explained how what appears to be one question actually encompasses all aspects of the practice of the Mahayana from the beginning of the path to the attainment of buddhahood. Shariputra appears to ask how someone who wants to practise diligently should train, but there are in fact five questions embedded in this one question.