Google+ 2001 Archive - Karmapa – The Official Website of the 17th Karmapa

NEWS & CURRENT ACTIVITES

Keep up to date with the Karmapa's activities, teachings and travels by subscribing by email or Twitter below. You can unsubscribe whenever you like.

Activities of The Karmapa 2000-2001 (2000-2001)

His Holiness was unable to make public statements until April, 2001, when he released a public statement and held a press conference. A number of media reports chronicled his activities at the time. At the end of 2001, he was permitted to travel to Bodhgaya, where he presided over the Pal Nyammay Kagyupay Sangha Monlam Chenmo, “The Great Monlam Aspiration of the Glorious Unequaled Kagyu Sangha.” The gathering of Kagyu monks from all over the world takes place annually at the Mahabodhi Temple Complex in Bodhgaya, India, under the Bodhi tree, the site where the Buddha attained enlightenment. Read the rest of this article

December 2001

His Holiness presides over the Drogen Kagyu Monlam in Bodhgaya at the end of 2001

His Holiness led the Drogen Kagyü Monlam in Bodhgaya at the end of December. The vast ceremony required the preparations of monks from many monasteries, including Rumtek, and was attended by many thousands of monastics and lay people. His Holiness presided over all the sessions, and also taught the monastics and foreigners daily from Gampopa’s Jewel Ornament of Liberation, and on other profound topics. Read the rest of this article

Time Magazine Interview with His Holiness May 10, 2001(Asia edition)

BY MICHAEL FATHERS

Sixteen-year-old Ugyen Trinley Dorje, the most senior religious leader in Tibet until he fled the country 15 months ago, has spoken for the first time since he joined the Dalai Lama in exile in India. Better known as the 17th incarnation of the Karmapa — and a possible successor to the Dalai Lama — the teenager’s press conference on April 27 lifted the veil on his personality. Two days later, he sat down with TIME’s South Asia bureau chief Michael Fathers and discussed growing up, missing his parents and his love of painting and music. Edited excerpts:

When do you expect to return to Tibet?

Having come to India as a refugee, I don’t plan to return to Tibet until the Dalai Lama returns. I will go back with him.

The government of China says you left your monastery to go to India to reclaim the Karmapa’s symbolic black hat and other religious possessions. They said your reasons were contained in a letter you left behind.

It is true that I left behind a letter. I am perfectly aware what was in it as I wrote it myself. I said in it that I was Read the rest of this article

The Observer

Interview with His Holiness
Apr 29, 2001 (United Kingdom)

BY LUKE HARDING

THE LHATOK region of eastern Tibet is about as remote as the country gets. Only a few hardy nomads eke out a living here, tending their yaks and wandering across a vast expanse of grassland enclosed by white mountains.

It was here 15 years ago that Ogyen Trinley Dorje was born, a baby whose life would eventually cause the Chinese government a great deal of embarrassment.

It was when he was eight that a search party arrived at his parents’ yak hair tent and solemnly announced that their mission was over. They had found the Karmapa, the latest incarnation of one of Tibetan Buddhism’s most senior leaders.

Three suns promptly appeared in the sky. Before that, ‘it would have seemed extremely disrespectful to have imagined I might be the Karmapa,’ he said yesterday.

Dorje was bundled off to Tsurphu monastery, 30 miles from the Read the rest of this article

The Observer Interview with His Holiness Apr 29, 2001 (United Kingdom)

BY LUKE HARDING

THE LHATOK region of eastern Tibet is about as remote as the country gets. Only a few hardy nomads eke out a living here, tending their yaks and wandering across a vast expanse of grassland enclosed by white mountains.

It was here 15 years ago that Ogyen Trinley Dorje was born, a baby whose life would eventually cause the Chinese government a great deal of embarrassment.

It was when he was eight that a search party arrived at his parents’ yak hair tent and solemnly announced that their mission was over. They had found the Karmapa, the latest incarnation of one of Tibetan Buddhism’s most senior leaders.

Three suns promptly appeared in the sky. Before that, ‘it would have seemed extremely disrespectful to have imagined I might be the Karmapa,’ he said yesterday.

Dorje was bundled off to Tsurphu monastery, 30 miles from the capital, Lhasa. The boy’s status was swiftly recognised by the Chinese government, which spent six years grooming him as a pliant rival to the Dalai Lama.

By late 1999, however, the Karmapa had Read the rest of this article